Wounded Warrior Redux

Note: Is this timely  or what. We’ve been having a discussion on this group for several days and up pops this report. Again, it’s your money, do as you please, but “caveat emptor.”

The charity for wounded veterans, the Wounded Warrior Project, is facing accusations of using donor money toward excessive spending on conferences and parties instead of on recovery programs, according to a CBS News report.

Army Staff Sergeant Erick Millette, who returned from Iraq in 2006 with a bronze star and a purple heart, told CBS News he admired the charity’s work and took a job with the group in 2014 but quit after two years.  “Their mission is to honor and empower wounded warriors, but what the public doesn’t see is how they spend their money,” he told CBS News. Millette said he witnessed lavish spending on staff, with big “catered” parties.

“Going to a nice fancy restaurant is not team building. Staying at a lavish hotel at the beach here in Jacksonville, and requiring staff that lives in the area to stay at the hotel is not team building,” he told CBS News.

According to the charity’s tax forms obtained by CBS News, spending on conferences and meetings went from $1.7 million in 2010, to $26 million in 2014, which is the same amount the group spends on combat stress recovery.

Two former of employees, who were so fearful of retaliation they asked that CBS News not show their faces on camera, said spending has skyrocketed since Steven Nardizzi took over as CEO in 2009, pointing to the 2014 annual meeting at a luxury resort in Colorado Springs.

“He rappelled down the side of a building at one of the all hands events. He’s come in on a Segway, he’s come in on a horse,” one employee told CBS News.

About 500 staff members attended the four-day conference in Colorado, which CBS News reported cost about $3 million.

Wounded Warrior Project declined CBS News’ interview requests for Nardizzi, but instead sent Director of Alumni and a recipient of their services, Captain Ryan Kules, who denied there was excessive spending on conferences.

“It’s the best use of donor dollars to ensure we are providing programs and services to our warriors and families at the highest quality,” he said.

Kules added the charity did not spend $3 million on the Colorado conference, but he was not there and was unable to say what it did cost. He also told CBS News that the charity does not spend money on alcohol or engages in any other kind of excessive spending.

 

One thought on “Wounded Warrior Redux”

  1. Wow Colonel – I feel duped – I have a small cleaning company and I have been donating a portion of my profits to them for years – I had originally looked them up to check them out and they claimed 85% went directly to the Wounded community.

    I was proud to send them funds thinking I was doing my part. …. Not anymore – sad in this day and age-by the way – amazing how the new CEO took over the same year our Potus took over – must be something in the air eh Colonel Jim ?

    Cpl. Bill Gaeckle
    United States Marine
    Drum and Bugle Corps
    Washington DC.
    1968 – 1971

Please leave a comment on this post or on any subject; all are appreciated. Thank you and Semper Fi, Jim